POINT GREY CLUB
Kai started his culinary journey as a chef at Quay restaurant in Sydney. He made the move to Taiwan and joined the opening team at MUME. He has recently moved onto Little Creatures, which is a little more laid-back, casual setting, but going back to his roots and focusing on bringing Australian cuisine to the eaters in Taipei.
Kai started his culinary journey as a chef at Quay restaurant in Sydney. He made the move to Taiwan and joined the opening team at MUME. He has recently moved onto Little Creatures, which is a little more laid-back, casual setting, but going back to his roots and focusing on bringing Australian cuisine to the eaters in Taipei.
Q: Tell us a little bit about yourself A: My name is Kai Ward, I’m 28 years old and I’m a chef. I’ve been cooking for about 13 years now. I first started right after high school, got straight into a kitchen just around the corner from my house in Albury, a small country town in Australia. 
 
Q: Do you have a cooking philosophy?
 A: When I first started cooking, I would stay in the kitchen 14 to 16 hours a day, for 5 or 6 days a week, if not, more. It’s necessary to put in the hard hours. Over the years, my cooking style has evolved as I’ve gone through different kitchens, but I’ve always held on to the same cooking philosophy, which is whatever you’re doing, do it to the best of your ability. It’s all about putting in the time and effort to master the small details. It’s also about repetition. There are certain things you learn when you do those long hours. If you could master the really simple things and get them right, it makes an incredibly big difference.


Q: Tell us a little bit about yourself My name is Kai Ward, I’m 28 years old and I’m a chef. I’ve been cooking for about 13 years now. I first started right after high school, got straight into a kitchen just around the corner from my house in Albury, a small country town in Australia. 
 
Q: Do you have a cooking philosophy?
 A: When I first started cooking, I would stay in the kitchen 14 to 16 hours a day, for 5 or 6 days a week, if not, more. It’s necessary to put in the hard hours. Over the years, my cooking style has evolved as I’ve gone through different kitchens, but I’ve always held on to the same cooking philosophy, which is whatever you’re doing, do it to the best of your ability. It’s all about putting in the time and effort to master the small details. It’s also about repetition. There are certain things you learn when you do those long hours. If you could master the really simple things and get them right, it makes an incredibly big difference.


Q: How do you usually start off your day?
 A: The first thing I do in the kitchen every morning is to sharpen my chef knife, it’s almost like a ritual now. I carry the knife everywhere I’ve been over the past 8 years. It’s a carefully hand-crafted Japanese chef knife I bought in Tokyo. To most chefs, one of the most important tools in their arsenal is knives. A knife is more than just a tool, but a symbolic item of the chef’s relationship with his profession. I think it’s really important to appreciate the crafts and stories behind every item in the kitchen.
Q: Tell us a little bit about yourself A: My name is Kai Ward, I’m 28 years old and I’m a chef. I’ve been cooking for about 13 years now. I first started right after high school, got straight into a kitchen just around the corner from my house in Albury, a small country town in Australia. 
 
Q: Do you have a cooking philosophy?
 A: When I first started cooking, I would stay in the kitchen 14 to 16 hours a day, for 5 or 6 days a week, if not, more. It’s necessary to put in the hard hours. Over the years, my cooking style has evolved as I’ve gone through different kitchens, but I’ve always held on to the same cooking philosophy, which is whatever you’re doing, do it to the best of your ability. It’s all about putting in the time and effort to master the small details. It’s also about repetition. There are certain things you learn when you do those long hours. If you could master the really simple things and get them right, it makes an incredibly big difference.


Q: How do you usually start off your day?
 A: The first thing I do in the kitchen every morning is to sharpen my chef knife, it’s almost like a ritual now. I carry the knife everywhere I’ve been over the past 8 years. It’s a carefully hand-crafted Japanese chef knife I bought in Tokyo. To most chefs, one of the most important tools in their arsenal is knives. A knife is more than just a tool, but a symbolic item of the chef’s relationship with his profession. I think it’s really important to appreciate the crafts and stories behind every item in the kitchen.
Q: How do you usually start off your day?
 A: The first thing I do in the kitchen every morning is to sharpen my chef knife, it’s almost like a ritual now. I carry the knife everywhere I’ve been over the past 8 years. It’s a carefully hand-crafted Japanese chef knife I bought in Tokyo. To most chefs, one of the most important tools in their arsenal is knives. A knife is more than just a tool, but a symbolic item of the chef’s relationship with his profession. I think it’s really important to appreciate the crafts and stories behind every item in the kitchen.
Q: Define your own personal style, what do you look for selecting clothes to wear? Style, comfort, fit?
 A: I started to appreciate fashion for what it is, especially the designers and craftsmen behind the pieces. With my job, I have to travel a lot for work or finding inspirations, so style and comfort are two things I look for when I’m getting dressed. When I think of YOYUU, I see a stylish, practical, and confident man. A man knows what he’s doing and appreciates the essence of craftsmanship.

Q: What does the word craftsmanship mean to you - in both culinary and fashion?
 A: I can also see the same level of dedication and craftsmanship in fashion. Cooking is an art, and chef is a craftsman. It’s not just about fresh ingredients and turning on the fire. It involves extensive knowledge of the chemistry of what ingredients work together. It’s about solid foundation, consistent perseverance, and creative innovation. While perfecting the fundamental techniques, having a progressive mindset is also important when it comes to forging a unique identity in the industry.
Q: Define your own personal style, what do you look for selecting clothes to wear? Style, comfort, fit?
 A: I started to appreciate fashion for what it is, especially the designers and craftsmen behind the pieces. With my job, I have to travel a lot for work or finding inspirations, so style and comfort are two things I look for when I’m getting dressed. When I think of YOYUU, I see a stylish, practical, and confident man. A man knows what he’s doing and appreciates the essence of craftsmanship. 

Q: What does the word craftsmanship mean to you - in both culinary and fashion? A: I can also see the same level of dedication and craftsmanship in fashion. Cooking is an art, and chef is a craftsman. It’s not just about fresh ingredients and turning on the fire. It involves extensive knowledge of the chemistry of what ingredients work together. It’s about solid foundation, consistent perseverance, and creative innovation. While perfecting the fundamental techniques, having a progressive mindset is also important when it comes to forging a unique identity in the industry.
Q: Define your own personal style, what do you look for selecting clothes to wear? Style, comfort, fit?
 A: I started to appreciate fashion for what it is, especially the designers and craftsmen behind the pieces. With my job, I have to travel a lot for work or finding inspirations, so style and comfort are two things I look for when I’m getting dressed. When I think of YOYUU, I see a stylish, practical, and confident man. A man knows what he’s doing and appreciates the essence of craftsmanship. 

Q: What does the word craftsmanship mean to you - in both culinary and fashion? A: I can also see the same level of dedication and craftsmanship in fashion. Cooking is an art, and chef is a craftsman. It’s not just about fresh ingredients and turning on the fire. It involves extensive knowledge of the chemistry of what ingredients work together. It’s about solid foundation, consistent perseverance, and creative innovation. While perfecting the fundamental techniques, having a progressive mindset is also important when it comes to forging a unique identity in the industry.

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